STDs We Test For…

The GetTested kit is validated for 10 most common STD’s in both males and females

Sorted by Infection Risk

Trichomoniasis (Trich) is an increasingly common STD caused by a parasite called Trichomonas vaginalis. It affects mainly women, although men can still be infected and spread the STD.

What are the symptoms?

Males will typically show no symptoms, but can still spread the STD. Females may experience a foul-smelling vaginal discharge, painful urination and itching. If left untreated it can lead to premature birth for women who are pregnant.

How is it transmitted?

Unprotected vaginal, anal or oral sexual intercourse is the largest contributor to the spread of Trich.

What is the incubation period?

Following unprotected intercourse with an individual who has trichomoniasis, a newly infected person will begin to show symptoms as soon as 5 days.

What is the testing process?

For males, a small urine sample is collected for analysis and testing. Females will collect a vaginal swab sample instead collecting a urine sample.

What treatment is available?

Consulting a doctor is the quickest way to receive the necessary treatment to cure trichomoniasis. Treatment will usually involve a course of oral antibiotics – tinidazole and metronidazole are the most commonly prescribed medications. Due to the high rate of infection, someone who is infected with trich should encourage their recent sexual partners to get tested, even if he/ she used protection or shows no symptoms.
Gonorrhea is a bacterial infection caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoea. It affects men more symptomatically than women.

What are the symptoms?

Men are more prone to this ailment and their genitals are most affected. Symptoms range from penile discharges, itching close to the head of the penis, swollen testicles and/or a burning sensation while urinating. Women will typically show no symptoms, but some might have a late onset of symptoms- 10 days- in the form of a vaginal discharge, burning during the passage of urine, cramps and abdominal pain. It can also reside as a bacterial infection in the throat and seem like nothing more than a sore throat.

How is it transmitted?

Unprotected vaginal, anal or oral sexual activity tends to spread Gonorhea.

What is the incubation period?

Any form of sex can cause Gonorrhea within 5 days in men and 10 days in women. Women mostly remain asymptomatic.

What is the testing process?

For males, a small urine sample is collected for analysis and testing. Females will collect a vaginal swab sample instead collecting a urine sample.

What treatment is available?

Gonorrhea can easily be cured with simple antibiotics as long as the regimen prescribed is followed and completed. Your partner should get tested and treated too as the threat of reinfection is real.
Chlamydia is a bacterial infection caused by the bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis. It is most often propagated by vaginal and anal sex. Complete penetration of the vagina or anus is not required to get infected as this bacteria can pass through the mucosal lining of tissue. What that means is that any mucous membrane that comes in contact with infected semen or vaginal discharge.

What are the symptoms?

Infected individuals will usually have no symptoms and in symptomatic cases men are seen having penal discharges, itching on and around the penal head and anal discharges if anal sex is the culprit. Women on rare occasions will experience vaginal discharges, genital irritation, unusual bleeding and abdominal pain.

How is it transmitted?

Vaginal and anal sex have been the primary modes of travel travel for this bacteria and in very rare instances oral sex has been a culprit.

What is the incubation period?

The incubation period is roughly one to three weeks.

What is the testing process?

For males, a small urine sample is collected for analysis and testing. Females will collect a vaginal swab sample instead of collecting a urine sample. Chlamydia and Gonorrhea are tested simultaneously by most labs and so do we through our test kits- Talk about two birds with one stone.

What treatment is available?

The treatment is fairly straightforward with an antibiotic therapy. However this disease needs detection first as most individuals are asymptomatic and fly under the radar.
The most common STD, 25% of women and 20% of men have genital herpes. There are no known cures for genital herpes, but it can be managed and treated.

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms of HSV 2 include pain, itching and small sores which can form ulcers and scabs. Many cases of HSV 2 are asymptomatic (produce or show no sign of infection or symptoms), carriers who are asymptomatic will still be able to spread herpes but are typically half as contagious as someone who is showing physical symptoms.

How is it transmitted?

Most often spread by unprotected vaginal, anal or oral sexual contact. It can also be spread by mother to child during the process of pregnancy and labor.

What is the incubation period?

The time it takes for symptoms to begin showing in infected persons can range from a few months to many years. In some cases, flu-like symptoms can develop during the initial stages of infection.

What is the testing process?

For males, a small urine sample is collected for analysis and testing. Females will collect a vaginal swab sample instead collecting a urine sample.

What treatment is available?

There is no cure for HSV 2, but an infected person can use antiviral medication to manage outbreaks and become symptom-free.
Scientifically known as Human Immunodeficiency Virus. HIV can progress to AIDS if not properly treated. HIV can cause progressive failure of the immune system.

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms of HIV can start within a few weeks. Flu-like symptoms such as fever, sore throat and fatigue can occur. HIV can sometimes be asymptomatic (produce or show no sign of infection or symptoms) until it progresses to AIDS.

How is it transmitted?

HIV can be spread through contact with infected blood (unclean needles or razors) or by having unprotected vaginal, oral or anal intercourse. HIV can also be passed from mother to child during the process of labor and birth.

What is the incubation period?

The time it takes for symptoms to begin showing can range from a few months to many years. In some cases, flu-like symptoms can develop during the initial stages of infection.

What is the testing process?

A blood sample is all that is required to detect HIV. We provide HIV 1/2 testing across all three product offerings.

What treatment is available?

There is currently no cure for HIV aids, but an infected person can undergo anti-retroviral regimes (ARVs) to reduce the speed in which the immune system breaks down and limit the amount of secondary infections that can occur as a result of living with HIV.
Commonly known as Hepatitis C, it is a viral disease which can cause chronic liver disease.

What are the symptoms?

Most people who have HCV will show no symptoms, but when someone does develop symptoms they can include nausea, fatigue, yellowing eyes and skin. An acute HCV infection can result in fever, dark urine, joint pain and vomiting.

How is it transmitted?

Spread by contact with contaminated blood, needles or unsterile tattoo equipment. Sex with an HCV-infected individual can also lead to HCV transmission.

What is the incubation period?

The incubation period for HCV is typically 6 to 9 weeks, but symptoms can begin to show in as little as 2 weeks or as much as 6 months.

What is the testing process?

A blood sample is all that is required to test for Hepatitis C. We offer a simple pain free solution to collect your blood sample in both our Standard and Comprehensive product offerings.

What treatment is available?

Consulting a doctor is the quickest way to receive the necessary treatment to cure HCV. Antiviral medication can reduce the impact of HCV on the body and some newer medicines can completely cure the disease. Avoiding alcohol and eating a healthy diet will also increase a person’s chances of curing HCV.
Syphilis develops in periodic stages, with symptoms becoming more significant the longer the infected individual goes without treatment.

What are the symptoms?

Syphilis starts off as a painless scab/ sore in either the genital, anal or oral region. The sore heals and, after a brief incubation period, turns into a rash. The rash can be quite large and expand outside of the area where the original sore was located. The final symptoms for Syphilis may not develop until years after the initial infection occurred but can cause permanent damage to the brain, eyes, and internal organs.

How is it transmitted?

There are three main ways that syphilis can be transmitted. By having unprotected vaginal, oral or anal sexual contact. From mother to baby during pregnancy and labor. Sharing blood, via unclean needles/ medical utensils and unscreened blood)

What is the incubation period?

The time it takes for symptoms to begin showing in infected persons can range from a few months to many years. In some cases, flu-like symptoms can develop during the initial stages of infection.

What is the testing process?

A blood sample is all that is required to test for Syphilis. We can test with a single drop of blood that can be extracted almost pain-free with our Standard and Comprehensive test panel offerings.

What treatment is available?

Syphilis can be treated with common antibiotics such as penicillin. Due to the highly contagious nature of the infection – it is important that any sexual partners receive treatment as well.
Also known as the Wart-Virus as it causes genital warts. HPV in the upper vaginal passage and cervix has been known to cause cervical cancer and infestation in the rectum is known to cause Anal cancer.

What are the symptoms?

Warts around the genitalia and anus are common but there are rare instances of not having any at all. The warts are usually slightly raised above the skin and have a whitish coloration. They do not usually itch or burn.

How is it transmitted?

Skin to skin contact is enough during Vaginal and anal sex.

What is the incubation period?

Warts appear months to years after one has acquired the virus.

What is the testing process?

HPV in its various forms may reside in the oral cavity, genitalia and anus. We offer a 3 site screening in our comprehensive package that can detect HPV at all three sites. All that is required is an oral rinse sample, a vaginal swab/urine sample and an anal swab.

What treatment is available?

HPV is not treatable and once the virus resides in your body it can stay there forever. Getting rid of the warts is a more cosmetic approach to mitigating the spread of HPV via direct skin contact. There are vaccines like Gardasil that can lend great immunity to an individual from genital and anal warts.
Mycoplasma Genitalium is considered to be a sexually transmitted pathogen. It is a microscopic bacterium that has no cellular wall causing it to be moderately resistant to antibiotic treatment. Mycoplasma Genitalium is a small pathogen that transmits and lives on cells of the urinary and genital tracts in humans. This pesky pathogen causes persistent urethritis typically in men, but can also affect women. According to the CDC, Mycoplasma Genitalium also causes cervicitis and pelvic inflammatory disease in women. As a result, it can lead to tubular infertility in females. This pathogen is less conclusive in women than in men as most women tend to appear asymptomatic. It can be found in the penis, mucus lining of the womb, vagina, cervix, and rectum. Studies report there is a substantial risk with developing urethritis, PID, and cervicitis when infected with Mycoplasma Genitalium, in addition to being a cofactor in HIV transmission. While this sexually transmitted pathogen is quite common, it can be treated successfully with antibiotics.

What are the symptoms?

Indiscriminate to gender, Mycoplasma Genitalium commonly causes inflammation in the urethra. Associated symptoms include watery discharge from the urinary tract and burning during urination. Symptoms also include pain and swelling of the joints (arthritis). In women, it causes cervicitis and pelvic inflammatory diseases, as well as, possible painful sexual intercourse and bleeding after sex. It is the most usual cause of non-chlamydial and non-gonococcal urethritis in men. While symptoms may appear asymptomatic in most cases, studies suggest that it is correlated in the development of prostate and ovarian cancers, as well as lymphomas. Furthermore, according to the CDC it is highly associated with the intensity of HIV infection.

How is it transmitted?

Recent studies have shown that Mycoplasma Genitalium is spread through unprotected penetrative sex. Since it can be found in the penis, rectum and vagina, it can therefore be spread by both anal and vaginal sex. However, studies suggest it is unclear whether or not it transmitted orally.

What is the incubation period?

The incubation period of Mycoplasma Genitalium is not usually determinate. Most cases vary between 2 – 35 days before signs and symptoms begin to occur in an infected individual.

What is the testing process?

Mycoplasma Genitalium is tested in males with urine samples and urethral swabs. Females are tested with urine samples, vaginal, and cervical swabs, as well as with endometrial biopsies.

What treatment is available?

Since Mycoplasma Genitalium lacks a cell wall it is moderately resistant to some antibiotics like beta-lactams (penicillins) as they target cell-wall biosynthesis. As a result higher doses and longer regimens tend to be used to combat this pesky sexually transmitted pathogen. Doxycycline and moxifloxacin are over the counter antibiotics that most doctors typically prescribe to eliminate this nuisance.

Specificity and Sensitivity

In clinical testing, the terms “sensitivity” and “specificity” are used as measures of performance and accuracy when it comes to identifying a positive or negative result correctly. “Sensitivity” defines the percentage of accuracy for positive results, while “specificity” defines the percentage of accuracy for correctly identifying negative results. Sensitivity and specificity for male and female tests sometimes differ depending on the test and the disease being tested for. Gettested.com test kits are highly accurate amongst most other testing means available today. Male Testing: Mycoplasma test sensitivity is 100% and specificity is 100% Female Testing: Mycoplasma test sensitivity is 100% and specificity is 100%
Ureaplasma Urealyticum is a bacterium belonging to the family Mycoplasmataceae, and is another common asymptomatic sexually transmitted infection. Ureaplasma is an etiologic agent (meaning it can be the cause of diseases and disorders). Like Mycoplasma, it can affect the urinary tract and reproductive organs leading to infertility and complications for both sexes. Left untreated Ureaplasma is considerably concerning for pregnant women and unborn babies since it can cause pre-term birth, stillborn birth, miscarriage, and postpartum infertility. Since it is a sexually transmitted infection, Ureaplasma can be transmitted to the fetus causing intra-amniotic infection, low birth weight, pneumonia, sepsis of the blood, and meningitis in newborns. Ureaplasmas is bacteria (not a virus) that colonize typically inside the urethra of males, and inside the vagina or cervix in females. Many cases occur in healthy patients who do not present any symptoms.

What are the symptoms?

Since Ureaplasma is an etiologic agent, this pesky bacterium is typically the culprit that causes certain diseases and disorders such as: urethritis, pyelonephritis, cystitis, urinary calculi, endometritis, infectious arthritis, surgical and non surgical wound infections, preterm labor, bacteremia, pneumonia, and meningitis. Thus, any sign or symptom of the above may be a sign or symptom of the root cause Ureaplasma infection. More common and direct symptoms of Ureaplasma infection in males result in nongonococcal urethritis. Females may notice unusual vaginal bleeding or spotting, abnormal vaginal odor, and abnormal color or consistency of vaginal discharge (these symptoms can result in pelvic inflammatory disease).

How is it transmitted?

Ureaplasma is spread through unprotected penetrative sex (it can be spread by oral, anal and vaginal intercourse). In pregnant women, this bacterial infection can also be passed on to the fetus and newborn babies.

What is the incubation period?

The incubation period for Ureaplasma is 10-20 days after sexual transmission.

What is the testing process?

Ureaplasma is tested in males with urine samples and urethral swabs. Females are tested with urine samples, vaginal, and cervical swabs, as well as with endometrial biopsies.

What treatment is available?

The treatment for Ureaplasma can be a complicated STI to treat since it is a bacterium without cell walls, so it tends to be drug resistant. However it is treatable with antibiotics. Doctors will usually prescribe erythromycin in divided doses, which can alternatively be used as an intravenous treatment for pregnant women with infected fetuses. A treatment of at least 10-15 days for all patients proves to be the most successful way to eliminate this pesky pathogen.

Specificity and Sensitivity

In clinical testing, the terms “sensitivity” and “specificity” are used as measures of performance and accuracy when it comes to identifying a positive or negative result correctly. “Sensitivity” defines the percentage of accuracy for positive results, while “specificity” defines the percentage of accuracy for correctly identifying negative results. Sensitivity and specificity for male and female tests sometimes differ depending on the test and the disease being tested for. Gettested.com test kits are highly accurate amongst most other testing means available today. Male Testing: Ureaplasma test sensitivity is 100% and specificity is 100% Female Testing: Ureaplasma test sensitivity is 100% and specificity is 100%

STD statistics and information sourced from: www.mayoclinic.org, www.cdc.gov, www.fda.gov and www.nlm.nih.gov